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Boost Your SQL Skills with the 1z0 047 Study Guide PDF 124



- Overview of the exam objectives and format - Tips and resources for studying and practicing H2: SQL Fundamentals - Data types and constraints - Basic SQL statements and clauses - Single-row and group functions - Joins and subqueries - Set operators and hierarchical queries H2: Manipulating Data - Inserting, updating, deleting, and merging data - Transaction control statements - Data dictionary views and metadata - Sequences, synonyms, and indexes H2: Creating and Managing Schema Objects - Creating and modifying tables, views, and indexes - Implementing constraints and triggers - Managing schema objects and data security H2: Generating Reports by Grouping Related Data - Using the GROUP BY clause and aggregate functions - Using the ROLLUP and CUBE operators - Using the GROUPING function and GROUPING SETS clause - Using the HAVING clause and subqueries H2: Retrieving Data by Using Subqueries - Writing simple and correlated subqueries - Using the EXISTS, IN, ANY, and ALL operators - Using the WITH clause and inline views - Using multiple-column subqueries H2: Manipulating Large Data Sets - Using subqueries to manipulate data - Using the multitable INSERT statement - Using the MERGE statement - Using conditional expressions H2: Hierarchical Retrieval - Writing hierarchical queries using the CONNECT BY clause - Using the START WITH clause to specify the root row - Using the ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause to order siblings - Using pseudocolumns to display hierarchical information H2: Regular Expression Support - Using regular expressions to search for, match, and replace strings - Using the REGEXP_LIKE, REGEXP_SUBSTR, REGEXP_INSTR, REGEXP_REPLACE, and REGEXP_COUNT functions - Using character classes, quantifiers, anchors, metacharacters, and subexpressions in regular expressions H1: How to Download the 1z0 047 Study Guide PDF 124 - Why download the study guide PDF? - How to access the official Oracle website and register for an account - How to find and download the study guide PDF file - How to open and view the PDF file on your device H1: Conclusion - Summary of the main points of the article - Call to action: encourage readers to take the exam and use the study guide PDF as a reference Table 2: Article with HTML formatting How to Prepare for the 1z0 047 Oracle Database SQL Expert Exam


If you want to demonstrate your proficiency in Oracle SQL and enhance your career prospects as a database developer or administrator, you might want to consider taking the 1z0 047 Oracle Database SQL Expert exam. This exam is one of the most popular and challenging Oracle certification exams that tests your knowledge and skills in writing efficient and complex SQL queries.




1z0 047 study guide pdf 124



In this article, we will give you an overview of the exam objectives and format, as well as some tips and resources for studying and practicing. We will also show you how to download the official study guide PDF that contains 124 questions and answers that cover all the topics of the exam. By following this guide, you will be well prepared to ace the exam and earn your Oracle Database SQL Expert certification.


SQL Fundamentals


The first section of the exam covers the basic concepts and syntax of SQL. You will need to know how to work with different data types and constraints, how to write basic SQL statements and clauses, how to use single-row and group functions, how to join and query data from multiple tables, and how to use set operators and hierarchical queries. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Data types and constraints: You should be familiar with the different data types that Oracle supports, such as VARCHAR2, NUMBER, DATE, TIMESTAMP, CLOB, BLOB, etc. You should also know how to apply constraints to enforce data integrity, such as NOT NULL, UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, FOREIGN KEY, CHECK, etc.



  • Basic SQL statements and clauses: You should be able to write SQL statements to perform various tasks, such as SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, ALTER, DROP, etc. You should also know how to use different clauses to filter, sort, and group data, such as WHERE, ORDER BY, GROUP BY, HAVING, etc.



  • Single-row and group functions: You should be able to use various functions to manipulate and aggregate data, such as CONCAT, SUBSTR, LENGTH, UPPER, LOWER, TRIM, TO_CHAR, TO_NUMBER, TO_DATE, SYSDATE, NVL, DECODE, CASE, SUM, AVG, MIN, MAX, COUNT, etc.



  • Joins and subqueries: You should be able to join data from multiple tables using different types of joins, such as INNER JOIN, LEFT OUTER JOIN, RIGHT OUTER JOIN, FULL OUTER JOIN, CROSS JOIN, NATURAL JOIN, etc. You should also know how to use subqueries to retrieve data from one or more tables based on the results of another query.



  • Set operators and hierarchical queries: You should be able to use set operators to combine the results of two or more queries into a single result set, such as UNION, UNION ALL, INTERSECT, MINUS. You should also know how to write hierarchical queries using the CONNECT BY clause to retrieve data that has a parent-child relationship.



Manipulating Data


The second section of the exam covers the techniques and commands for manipulating data in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to insert, update, delete, and merge data using SQL statements, how to control transactions using commit, rollback, and savepoint statements, how to access data dictionary views and metadata, and how to create and use sequences, synonyms, and indexes. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Inserting, updating, deleting, and merging data: You should be able to use the INSERT statement to add new rows to a table, the UPDATE statement to modify existing rows in a table, the DELETE statement to remove rows from a table, and the MERGE statement to perform conditional insertions or updates based on a join condition.



  • Transaction control statements: You should be able to use the COMMIT statement to make permanent changes to the database, the ROLLBACK statement to undo changes made in the current transaction, and the SAVEPOINT statement to mark a point in the transaction that can be rolled back to later.



  • Data dictionary views and metadata: You should be able to use the data dictionary views to obtain information about the database objects and structures, such as USER_TABLES, USER_COLUMNS, USER_CONSTRAINTS, USER_INDEXES, etc. You should also know how to use the DESCRIBE command and the DBMS_METADATA package to display the metadata of database objects.



  • Sequences, synonyms, and indexes: You should be able to create and use sequences to generate unique numbers for primary keys or other purposes, synonyms to provide alternative names for database objects, and indexes to improve the performance of queries by creating pointers to the data.



Creating and Managing Schema Objects


The third section of the exam covers the skills and commands for creating and managing schema objects in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to create and modify tables, views, and indexes using SQL statements, how to implement constraints and triggers to enforce business rules and perform actions based on events, how to manage schema objects and data security using SQL statements. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Creating and modifying tables, views, and indexes: You should be able to use the CREATE TABLE statement to create a table with columns, constraints, storage options, etc., the ALTER TABLE statement to modify the structure or properties of a table, the CREATE VIEW statement to create a view based on one or more tables or views, the ALTER VIEW statement to modify the definition or properties of a view, the CREATE INDEX statement to create an index on one or more columns of a table or view, and the ALTER INDEX statement to modify the structure or properties of an index.



ing constraints and triggers: You should be able to use the CONSTRAINT clause to define various types of constraints on table columns, such as PRIMARY KEY, FOREIGN KEY, UNIQUE, CHECK, etc. You should also know how to use the CREATE TRIGGER statement to create a trigger that executes a PL/SQL block or a stored procedure when a specified event occurs on a table or view, such as INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, etc.


  • Managing schema objects and data security: You should be able to use the DROP statement to remove a schema object from the database, the RENAME statement to change the name of a schema object, the TRUNCATE statement to delete all rows from a table without logging, and the FLASHBACK statement to restore a table to a previous state. You should also know how to use the GRANT and REVOKE statements to grant and revoke privileges and roles to users and roles, and how to use the AUDIT and NOAUDIT statements to enable and disable auditing of database activities.



Generating Reports by Grouping Related Data


The fourth section of the exam covers the techniques and commands for generating reports by grouping related data in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to use the GROUP BY clause and aggregate functions to group and summarize data, how to use the ROLLUP and CUBE operators to produce subtotal and grand total values, how to use the GROUPING function and GROUPING SETS clause to identify the level of aggregation, how to use the HAVING clause and subqueries to filter groups based on a condition. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Using the GROUP BY clause and aggregate functions: You should be able to use the GROUP BY clause to divide the rows of a query result into groups based on one or more columns or expressions, and use aggregate functions such as SUM, AVG, MIN, MAX, COUNT, etc. to calculate summary values for each group.



  • Using the ROLLUP and CUBE operators: You should be able to use the ROLLUP operator to generate subtotal values for each level of grouping from right to left, and use the CUBE operator to generate subtotal values for all possible combinations of grouping columns. For example, if you group by A, B, and C columns, ROLLUP will produce subtotals for (A,B,C), (A,B), (A), and grand total; CUBE will produce subtotals for (A,B,C), (A,B), (A,C), (B,C), (A), (B), (C), and grand total.



  • Using the GROUPING function and GROUPING SETS clause: You should be able to use the GROUPING function to distinguish between NULL values that represent aggregated values and NULL values that represent missing values in the query result. The GROUPING function returns 1 for aggregated values and 0 for non-aggregated values. You should also know how to use the GROUPING SETS clause to specify multiple grouping sets in a single query. A grouping set is a subset of columns or expressions that are used for grouping. For example, if you group by A, B, and C columns, you can specify GROUPING SETS ((A,B), (A,C), (B,C)) to get subtotals for only those combinations.



  • Using the HAVING clause and subqueries: You should be able to use the HAVING clause to filter groups based on a condition that involves an aggregate function or a group function. The HAVING clause is similar to the WHERE clause but applies after the grouping is done. You should also know how to use subqueries in the HAVING clause or in the SELECT list of a query that uses grouping. A subquery is a query within a query that returns a single value or a set of values that can be used for comparison or calculation.



Retrieving Data by Using Subqueries


The fifth section of the exam covers the skills and commands for retrieving data by using subqueries in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to write simple and correlated subqueries to retrieve data from one or more tables based on the results of another query, how to use the EXISTS, IN, ANY, and ALL operators to test the existence or value of subquery results, how to use the WITH clause and inline views to simplify complex queries, and how to use multiple-column subqueries to compare more than one column of a table or view. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Writing simple and correlated subqueries: You should be able to write simple subqueries that return a single value or a set of values that can be used in the WHERE clause, the HAVING clause, or the SELECT list of another query. You should also be able to write correlated subqueries that refer to one or more columns of the outer query and are executed once for each row of the outer query. For example, you can use a correlated subquery to find the employees who earn more than the average salary of their department.



  • Using the EXISTS, IN, ANY, and ALL operators: You should be able to use the EXISTS operator to test whether a subquery returns any rows, and use the IN operator to test whether a value matches any value in a subquery result. You should also know how to use the ANY and ALL operators to compare a value with a set of values returned by a subquery. The ANY operator returns true if the comparison is true for at least one value in the set, and the ALL operator returns true if the comparison is true for all values in the set.



  • Using the WITH clause and inline views: You should be able to use the WITH clause to define one or more subqueries that can be referenced by name in the main query or in other subqueries. The WITH clause can help simplify complex queries and improve performance by avoiding repeated execution of subqueries. You should also know how to use inline views, which are subqueries in the FROM clause of a query that act as temporary tables or views.



  • Using multiple-column subqueries: You should be able to use multiple-column subqueries that return more than one column of values that can be compared with another table or view. You can use multiple-column subqueries in the WHERE clause or in the HAVING clause of a query, and use comparison operators such as =, , >, =, <=, etc. to compare each pair of columns.



Manipulating Large Data Sets


The sixth section of the exam covers the techniques and commands for manipulating large data sets in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to use subqueries to manipulate data, how to use the multitable INSERT statement to insert data into multiple tables based on conditions, how to use the MERGE statement to perform conditional insertions or updates based on a join condition, and how to use conditional expressions to evaluate multiple conditions and return different values. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Using subqueries to manipulate data: You should be able to use subqueries in the INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, and MERGE statements to insert, update, delete, or merge data based on the results of another query. For example, you can use a subquery to insert data into a table from another table, update data in a table based on data from another table, delete data from a table that matches data from another table, or merge data from two tables into one table.



  • Using the multitable INSERT statement: You should be able to use the multitable INSERT statement to insert data from a single source into multiple tables based on conditions. You can use different types of multitable inserts, such as unconditional, conditional, pivoting, or non-pivoting. For example, you can use an unconditional multitable insert to insert data into multiple tables without any condition, a conditional multitable insert to insert data into different tables based on different conditions, a pivoting multitable insert to insert data into one table with multiple columns based on values from one column of another table, or a non-pivoting multitable insert to insert data into one table with one column based on values from multiple columns of another table.



  • Using the MERGE statement: You should be able to use the MERGE statement to perform conditional insertions or updates based on a join condition between a source table or view and a target table. You can specify a WHEN MATCHED clause to update existing rows in the target table that match rows in the source table or view, and a WHEN NOT MATCHED clause to insert new rows into the target table that do not match any rows in the source table or view.



value if the original value is null, a NULLIF function to return null if two values are equal, or a COALESCE function to return the first non-null value from a list of values.


Hierarchical Retrieval


The seventh section of the exam covers the skills and commands for hierarchical retrieval in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to write hierarchical queries using the CONNECT BY clause to retrieve data that has a parent-child relationship, how to use the START WITH clause to specify the root row of the hierarchy, how to use the ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause to order siblings in the hierarchy, and how to use pseudocolumns to display hierarchical information. Here are some of the topics you should review:


  • Writing hierarchical queries using the CONNECT BY clause: You should be able to use the CONNECT BY clause to specify the relationship between parent and child rows in a table or view. The CONNECT BY clause uses a condition that compares a column in the parent row with a column in the child row. For example, you can use CONNECT BY PRIOR employee_id = manager_id to retrieve data from an employees table that has a self-referencing foreign key.



  • Using the START WITH clause to specify the root row: You should be able to use the START WITH clause to specify which row or rows should be used as the root or starting point of the hierarchy. The START WITH clause uses a condition that filters the rows of the table or view. For example, you can use START WITH employee_id = 100 to retrieve data from an employees table that starts with the employee whose ID is 100.



  • Using the ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause to order siblings: You should be able to use the ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause to order siblings in the hierarchy based on one or more columns or expressions. The ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause is similar to the ORDER BY clause but applies after the hierarchy is constructed. For example, you can use ORDER SIBLINGS BY last_name, first_name to order siblings in an employees table by their names.



  • Using pseudocolumns to display hierarchical information: You should be able to use pseudocolumns to display additional information about the hierarchy, such as LEVEL, CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF, CONNECT_BY_ISCYCLE, SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH, etc. A pseudocolumn is a column that is not stored in the table but is generated by Oracle when a query is executed. For example, you can use LEVEL to display the depth of each row in the hierarchy, CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF to indicate whether a row is a leaf node or not, CONNECT_BY_ISCYCLE to indicate whether a row has a cycle or not, SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH to display the path from the root to each row, etc.



Regular Expression Support


The eighth and final section of the exam covers the skills and commands for regular expression support in Oracle databases. You will need to know how to use regular expressions to search for, match, and replace strings using SQL statements and functions, how to use


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